The key to really hitting the nail on the head with investors is by revealing just the right amount of information in your pitch. Not too much, not too little.

Think of it as reading a book but having someone rip out the final pages. You’d do anything to get your hands on those pages and finish the book. This is the exact same scenario when pitching your business idea. You want to capture the attention of investors, but keep them hungry for more.

But how can you prepare the perfect pitch without giving away too much?

We’ve got a few ideas.

Here are our 5 simple – yet proven- tips to pitching your business idea without revealing too much.

1. Understand Your Audience

The most important part of getting your message across is understanding your audience and press the right buttons to get them to react to your pitch. Do your homework and find out what motivates them.

And no, we don’t mean throwing around a motivational quote or two. We mean finding out about their past investments, hobbies, and interests – and using them to your advantage.

Understanding who you’re pitching to doesn’t require you to reveal too much information, but just the bit and pieces relevant to your target group.

2. Get to the Point

With most pitching presentations being only a few minutes long, you don’t have much time to tell your entire brand story. So skip the irrelevant details and get to the point. You’re here to sell your brand – not give an in-depth interview.

Yes, we get that you’re really excited about telling your whole brand story but save some details for the meetings that you’ll – hopefully– secure with investors.

3. Don’t Use Too Many Slides

Minimize the number of slides you use for your presentation. Did you know that software companyBufferhad 10 slides in their presentation that helped them land $500,000 in 3 months? This goes to show that less really is more sometimes.

Having less slides in your presentation will make sure you don’t reveal too much. Rather, enough to stir up interest. Also, it will keep you from going astray from important talking points.

4. Show Facts, Stats, and Figures

Investors are interested in the numbers. What’s in it for them if they invest in your brand? What results have you achieved so far? Strengthen your pitch by using plenty of facts, statistics, and figures. Moreover, the way you present these numbers is pivotal. Add some zing to your presentation with big bold fonts, large icons, and color. You want your presentation to be visually engaging in order for it to leave a strong impression. So take your time with designing your pitch deck.

Furthermore, though confidence is key when pitching to investors and early consumers, you don’t want to come across as too self-assertive. Avoid hockey stick presentations that have graphs and data that seem far-fetched. Keep your pitch realistic above all else.

5. Establish the Need

Convince investors and potential consumers that they have a problem. Then assure them that you have a solution to their problem. Use an example to depict this problem. Define and visualize the problem for them. Describe the ramifications and then explain how you can help solve it – as simple and as straightforward as possible.

Testimonials also go a long way in a pitch. Share what real users are saying about your products or services. This way, you can keep information limited and let your customer testimonials do the talking and convincing for you.

It’s Time to Pitch

Remember, you want to throw the bait – in this case your pitch- and wait for investors to bite. Too much information won’t entice investors to invest in you. But holding back even just one piece of the puzzle will drive them crazy with curiosity. Brevity is the key to the initial success of a pitch.

Follow our tips to preparing the perfect pitch without revealing too much information and turn your big idea into an even bigger business.

Want to go that extra mile and protect your big idea? Trademark your brand name, logo, and other business elements. We can help you with all your trademark related questions. Let’s talk.